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Thursday, October 13, 2016

Art Project Share 3: Using Apoxie Clay In Bookmaking

Art Project Share 3:  Using Apoxie Clay in Bookmaking

By Lynne Suprock

Creative clay inspiration began a while back... in kindergarten and elementary school art class days. My favorite was the air dry grey colored clay.  With it, I made elephants, hand print plaques, and a few mugs.  (Oh my!)


Since then, there have been so many sculpting products developed for art use.  My current favorite is the Apoxie Clay from Aves. https://www.avesstudio.com   I’ve used Aves products in my design work with students, making tiaras and altering glass bottles.



As well, I took a workshop with Michael DeMeng, while I working at an Art Is You event in 2012, and became exposed to the “creature factor” as another way to use this epoxy clay product ….how fun! 


So, the thing is, this stuff is terrific to use for creating altered book plates and making little book pendants! Being able to stamp into it, mold it, and have it adhere to almost anything, makes it work very well as a creative medium.  These are some of my little books featured in PAGES, a Cloth-Paper-Scissors publication that shows how yummy the stamping actually does look.






In 2013 I created a larger version of Apoxie Clay book, with movable parts, for a workshop that unfortunately was cancelled due to schedule conflicts. These books actually had draw bridges and doors.   



Below there samples of a few little books made with metal and an Apoxie Clay binding.  They are similar to the one seen in this summer's issue of BelleArmoire Magazine in an article  collaboration with art sister, Cat Kerr. www.stampington.com


Here are samples of other books using this wonderful product!


  
                                       


SOME TIPS:
For all of the books shown, I used either Aves Apoxie Clay Sculpt or Apoxie Super White.  These clays are a 2 part epoxy type that air dries and hardens, noticeably so in just 2 hours.  

When working with 2 part Epoxy Clay, always wear gloves.  It will absorb into the skin in its malleable state. The clay is very sticky as well, so work on a non stick craft mat.

Choose a surface to adhere the clay such as heavy cardboard, chip board, balsa wood or metal.  Something with a little tooth is good.  However, I used 24 G copper for my book plates, so I sand the metal first.

When using your rubber stamps to make impressions in the clay, make sure to use a mold release spray prior to stamping.  

Be sure to clean your stamps with a toothbrush, warm water and a little dish soap when you are finished. Otherwise, the hardened clay will stick into the crevices of your rubber stamp.

If painting, use a thin coat of white gesso to prime the clay once it is dry first, and paint it with acrylics.  

For depth and dimension, use a little Rub-N-Buff or Guilder’s Paste over the acrylics on parts that are raised from stamping in the clay.  You may seal with a matte or gloss liquid gel media, but it is not necessary.


Follow me on FB where you can instant message me with any questions.  

Stay tuned for Segment Five with more stories, images, and tips throughout the weeks and months ahead. 

4 comments :

Jen Crossley said...

Stunning work love your books Lynne the ones in belle amoire

Sue Marrazzo said...

A Brilliant POST!

Lynne Suprock said...

Thank you Jen and Sue! I am glad you guys liked. I enjoyed the sharing. :-)

Carol deSousa said...

What a great product, thanks for sharing! I love your little books too! <3

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